Monthly Archives: December 2014

Poor weather, rising seas frustrate efforts to reach suspected AirAsia plane wreck

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* Divers to try and investigate suspected plane wreck on sea floor

* Experts say plane likely intact when hit water

* Data shows plane climbed steeply before disappearing (Recasts after change in weather)

By Fergus Jensen and Cindy Silviana

PANGKALAN BUN/JAKARTA, Indonesia, Jan 1 (Reuters) – Search teams looking for the sunken wreck of an AirAsia jet off Borneo struggled to resume full-scale operations on Thursday after a small window of fine weather closed, giving way to rising seas which have dogged the search from the start.

As dawn broke, revealing blue skies, hopes had risen for divers to be able to investigate what is believed to be the fuselage of the Airbus A320-200, which was carrying 162 people when it crashed on Sunday during stormy weather on a flight from the Indonesian city of Surabaya to Singapore.

“Clouds have started to descend again…and the weather conditions will deteriorate again,” search and rescue official Tatang Zaenudin told TV, adding that the conditions would limit air searches. “For the sea search, we will continue.”

A team of 47 Indonesian Navy divers is on standby to go down to a large, dark object detected by sonar on the ocean floor, lying just 30-50 metres (100-165 feet) deep. If it is the AirAsia plane, divers would look to retrieve its black boxes.

None of the tell-tale black box “pings” had been detected, an official said.

Investigators are working on a theory that the plane went into an aerodynamic stall as it climbed steeply to avoid a storm about 40 minutes into the flight.

So far, at least seven bodies have been recovered from waters near the suspected crash site, along with debris such a suitcase, an emergency slide and a life jacket.

The bodies are being taken in numbered coffins to Surabaya, where relatives of the victims have gathered, for identification. Authorities have been collecting DNA from the relatives to help identify the bodies.

Most of the 162 people on board were Indonesians. No survivors have been found.

Relatives, many of whom collapsed in grief when they saw the first grim television pictures confirming their fears on Tuesday, held prayers at a crisis centre at Surabaya airport.

“UNBELIEVABLY” STEEP CLIMB

The plane was travelling at 32,000 feet (9,753 metres) and had asked to fly at 38,000 feet to avoid bad weather. When air traffic controllers granted permission for a rise to 34,000 feet a few minutes later, they received no response.

A source close to the probe into what happened said radar data appeared to show that the aircraft made an “unbelievably” steep climb before it crashed, possibly pushing it beyond the Airbus A320’s limits.

“So far, the numbers taken by the radar are unbelievably high. This rate of climb is very high, too high. It appears to be beyond the performance envelope of the aircraft,” he said.

The source, who declined to be named, added that more information was needed to come to a firm conclusion.

Online discussion among pilots has centred on unconfirmed secondary radar data from Malaysia that suggested the aircraft was climbing at a speed of 353 knots, about 100 knots too slow, and that it might have stalled.

Some of the bodies recovered so far have been fully clothed, including a flight attendant in her uniform. That could indicate the Airbus was intact when it hit the water and also support the aerodynamic stall theory.

The Indonesian captain, a former air force fighter pilot, had 6,100 flying hours under his belt and the plane last underwent maintenance in mid-November, according to the airline, which is 49 percent owned by Malaysia-based budget carrier AirAsia.

Three airline disasters involving Malaysian-affiliated carriers in less than a year have dented confidence in the country’s aviation industry and spooked travellers.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went missing in March en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew and has not been found. On July 17, the same airline’s Flight MH17 was shot down over Ukraine, killing all 298 people on board.

On board Flight QZ8501 were 155 Indonesians, three South Koreans, and one person each from Singapore, Malaysia and Britain. The co-pilot was French.

The AirAsia group, including affiliates in Thailand, the Philippines and India, had not suffered a crash since its Malaysian budget operations began in 2002.

(Additional reporting by Wilda Asmarini, Gayatri Suroyo, Kanupriya Kapoor, Michael Taylor, Nicholas Owen and Charlotte Greenfield in JAKARTA/SURABAYA, Jane Wardell in SYDNEY and Anshuman Daga in SINGAPORE; Editing by Mark Bendeich and Nick Macfie)

  • Disasters & Accidents
  • Transportation
  • AirAsia






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Samsung Electronics says new smart TVs in 2015 to run Tizen platform

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Year-To-Date Winners: We Have Found The Market And It's Apple

APPLE – THE BEST OPPORTUNITY EVER?

I SEE APPLE GOING BACK ABOVE $300, SOONER RATHER THAN LATER

SEOUL (Reuters) – Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said on Thursday that all its new smart television products launched in 2015 will be powered by the Tizen operating system, marking a fresh effort by the company to increase the usage of the software platform.

Smart TVs offer additional software and connectivity functions, such as video streaming and web browsing capabilities. Samsung demonstrated TV sets powered by Tizen at developer conferences last year.

“We are focusing our efforts on Tizen right now,” Kim Hyun-suk, Samsung’s president of visual display business, told Reuters in an interview. “We hope that other TV makers will also use it and help build an ecosystem that will help the platform grow.”

Televisions would be an addition to the modest stable of Tizen products, which consists of a few smartwatches and cameras despite years of development and support by the world’s top maker of smartphones and TVs.

The platform represents the most visible effort on the software front by Samsung, which has sought to free itself from Google Inc’s Android platform.

But Tizen has so far failed to take off, due in part to Samsung’s failure to launch a smartphone powered by the system. Some analysts are sceptical about the platform’s viability despite Samsung’s standing as top smartphone maker, especially as Android and Apple Inc’s iOS tighten their grip in the smartphone sector.

Developers say that until there is a meaningful user base for Tizen they will have little incentive to make innovative software applications for the system, deemed crucial if Samsung is to convince wary consumers to try it out.

While the launch of Tizen-based TVs will increase the platform’s user base, it is unclear if that alone will be enough to pique developers’ interest. Users of smart TVs tend to use fewer apps than they would on smartphones.

Still, the operating system is expected to play a key role in Samsung’s smart-home business. Tizen can also run on devices with low computing power such as refrigerators and washing machines, offering a way for users to monitor and control such devices remotely.

Samsung did not give sales targets for Tizen-powered TVs.

(Reporting by Se Young Lee; Editing by David Holmes)






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Improved weather raises hopes that divers can reach suspected AirAsia plane wreck

This post was originally published on this site

* Divers to try and investigate suspected plane wreck on sea
floor

* Experts say plane likely intact when hit water

* Data shows plane climbed steeply before disappearing

(Updates with number of bodies recovered, weather conditions at
site)

By Fergus Jensen and Wilda Asmarini

PANGKALAN BUN/SURABAYA, Indonesia, Jan 1 (Reuters) – A break
in bad weather on Thursday raised hopes that divers would be
able to investigate what is believed to be the sunken wreck of
an AirAsia (Kuala Lumpur: 5099.KLnews) jet off Borneo and retrieve the plane’s black box
that should explain the cause of the crash.

The Airbus A320-200, carrying 162 people, fell from
the sky while trying to climb above stormy weather early on
Sunday, during a flight from the Indonesian city of Surabaya to
Singapore. The pilots did not issue a distress signal.

So far, at least eight bodies have been recovered from
waters near where sonar has detected a large, dark object on the
ocean floor, lying just 30-50 metres (100-165 feet) deep. But so
far rough seas have prevented divers from investigating it.

“They will try again this morning,” said Siahala Alamsyah, a
naval officer involved in the search. He said that on Wednesday
night, bad weather had prevented a team of 47 Indonesian Navy
divers from even flying out to warships at the crash site.

However, the skies over Pangkalan Bun air base near the site
cleared on Thursday morning and the seas calmed, raising hopes
that the search effort could be stepped up.

The plane’s black box flight data and cockpit voice recorder
should help solve the mystery of the crash. Investigators are
working on a theory that it went into aerodynamic stall as the
pilot climbed steeply to avoid a storm.

Bodies recovered from the Java Sea are being taken in
numbered coffins to Surabaya, where relatives of the victims
have gathered, for identification. Authorities have been
collecting DNA from the relatives to help identify the bodies.

Some of the bodies recovered so far have been fully clothed,
including a flight attendant still wearing her AirAsia uniform.
That could indicate the Airbus was intact when it hit the water
and also support the aerodynamic stall theory.

Most of the 162 people on board were Indonesians. No
survivors have been found.

HUNT FOR “BLACK BOX”

Strong wind and waves hampered the search, and with
visibility at less than a kilometre (half a mile), the air
operation was called off on Wednesday afternoon.

Speaking on Wednesday evening, Fransiskus Bambang Soelistyo,
the head of the search and rescue agency, said the weather was
“challenging in the field, with waves up to 5 metres high, wind
reaching 40 km per hour (and) heavy rain, especially in the
search area.”

Indonesian President Joko Widodo said his priority was
retrieving the bodies.

Relatives, many of whom collapsed in grief when they saw the
first grim television pictures confirming their fears on
Tuesday, held prayers at a crisis centre at Surabaya airport.

“UNBELIEVABLY” STEEP CLIMB

The plane was travelling at 32,000 feet (9,753 metres) and
had asked to fly at 38,000 feet to avoid bad weather. When air
traffic controllers granted permission for a rise to 34,000 feet
a few minutes later, they received no response.

A source close to the probe into what happened said radar
data appeared to show that the aircraft made an “unbelievably”
steep climb before it crashed, possibly pushing it beyond the
Airbus A320’s limits.

“So far, the numbers taken by the radar are unbelievably
high. This rate of climb is very high, too high. It appears to
be beyond the performance envelope of the aircraft,” he said.

The source, who declined to be named, added that more
information was needed to come to a firm conclusion.

Online discussion among pilots has centred on unconfirmed
secondary radar data from Malaysia that suggested the aircraft
was climbing at a speed of 353 knots, about 100 knots too slow,
and that it might have stalled.

The Indonesian captain, a former air force fighter pilot,
had 6,100 flying hours under his belt and the plane last
underwent maintenance in mid-November, according to the airline,
which is 49 percent owned by Malaysia-based budget carrier
AirAsia.

Three airline disasters involving Malaysian-affiliated
carriers in less than a year have dented confidence in the
country’s aviation industry and spooked travellers.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went missing in March on a
trip from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew
and has not been found. On July 17, the same airline’s Flight
MH17 was shot down over Ukraine, killing all 298 people on
board.

On board Flight QZ8501 were 155 Indonesians, three South
Koreans, and one person each from Singapore, Malaysia and
Britain. The co-pilot was French.

The AirAsia group, including affiliates in Thailand, the
Philippines and India, had not suffered a crash since its
Malaysian budget operations began in 2002.

(Additional reporting by Gayatri Suroyo, Kanupriya Kapoor,
Michael Taylor and Charlotte Greenfield in JAKARTA/SURABAYA,
Jane Wardell in SYDNEY and Anshuman Daga in SINGAPORE; Editing
by Mark Bendeich and Ryan Woo)






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Improved weather raises hopes that divers can reach suspected AirAsia plane wreck

This post was originally published on this site

* Divers to try and investigate suspected plane wreck on sea floor

* Experts say plane likely intact when hit water

* Data shows plane climbed steeply before disappearing (Adds latest on search operation)

By Fergus Jensen and Wilda Asmarini

PANGKALAN BUN/SURABAYA, Indonesia, Jan 1 (Reuters) – A break in bad weather raised hopes on Thursday that divers would be able to investigate what is believed to be the sunken wreck of an AirAsia jet off Borneo and retrieve the black boxes that should explain the cause of the crash.

The Airbus A320-200, carrying 162 people, fell from the sky while trying to climb above stormy weather early on Sunday, during a flight from the Indonesian city of Surabaya to Singapore. The pilots did not issue a distress signal.

So far, at least seven bodies have been recovered from waters near where sonar has detected a large, dark object on the ocean floor, lying just 30-50 metres (100-165 feet) deep, but heavy seas have so far prevented divers from investigating it.

“They will try again this morning,” said Siahala Alamsyah, a naval officer involved in the search. He said that on Wednesday night, bad weather had prevented a team of 47 Indonesian Navy divers from even flying out to warships at the crash site.

The plane’s black box flight data and cockpit voice recorder should help solve the mystery of the crash. Investigators are working on a theory that it went into aerodynamic stall as the pilot climbed steeply to avoid a storm.

Bodies recovered from the Java Sea are being taken in numbered coffins to Surabaya, where relatives of the victims have gathered, for identification. Authorities have been collecting DNA from the relatives to help identify the bodies.

Some of the bodies recovered so far have been fully clothed, including a flight attendant still wearing her AirAsia uniform. That could indicate the Airbus was intact when it hit the water and also support the aerodynamic stall theory.

Most of the 162 people on board were Indonesians. No survivors have been found.

HUNT FOR “BLACK BOX”

Strong wind and waves hampered the search and with visibility at less than a kilometre (half a mile), the air operation was called off on Wednesday afternoon.

“The weather today was really challenging in the field, with waves up to 5 metres high, wind reaching 40 km per hour (and) heavy rain, especially in the search area,” Fransiskus Bambang Soelistyo, the head of the search and rescue agency, said.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo said his priority was retrieving the bodies.

Relatives, many of whom collapsed in grief when they saw the first grim television pictures confirming their fears on Tuesday, held prayers at a crisis centre at Surabaya airport.

“UNBELIEVABLY” STEEP CLIMB

The plane was travelling at 32,000 feet (9,753 metres) and had asked to fly at 38,000 feet to avoid bad weather. When air traffic controllers granted permission for a rise to 34,000 feet a few minutes later, they received no response.

A source close to the probe into what happened said radar data appeared to show that the aircraft made an “unbelievably” steep climb before it crashed, possibly pushing it beyond the Airbus A320’s limits.

“So far, the numbers taken by the radar are unbelievably high. This rate of climb is very high, too high. It appears to be beyond the performance envelope of the aircraft,” he said.

The source, who declined to be named, added that more information was needed to come to a firm conclusion.

Online discussion among pilots has centred on unconfirmed secondary radar data from Malaysia that suggested the aircraft was climbing at a speed of 353 knots, about 100 knots too slow, and that it might have stalled.

The Indonesian captain, a former air force fighter pilot, had 6,100 flying hours under his belt and the plane last underwent maintenance in mid-November, according to the airline, which is 49 percent owned by Malaysia-based budget carrier AirAsia.

Three airline disasters involving Malaysian-affiliated carriers in less than a year have dented confidence in the country’s aviation industry and spooked travellers.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went missing in March on a trip from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew and has not been found. On July 17, the same airline’s Flight MH17 was shot down over Ukraine, killing all 298 people on board.

On board Flight QZ8501 were 155 Indonesians, three South Koreans, and one person each from Singapore, Malaysia and Britain. The co-pilot was French.

The AirAsia group, including affiliates in Thailand, the Philippines and India, had not suffered a crash since its Malaysian budget operations began in 2002.

(Additional reporting by Gayatri Suroyo, Kanupriya Kapoor, Michael Taylor and Charlotte Greenfield in JAKARTA/SURABAYA, Jane Wardell in SYDNEY and Anshuman Daga in SINGAPORE; Editing by Mark Bendeich)

  • Disasters & Accidents
  • Transportation
  • AirAsia






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Improved weather raises hopes that divers can reach suspected AirAsia plane wreck

This post was originally published on this site

* Divers to try and investigate suspected plane wreck on sea
floor

* Experts say plane likely intact when hit water

* Data shows plane climbed steeply before disappearing

(Adds latest on search operation)

By Fergus Jensen and Wilda Asmarini

PANGKALAN BUN/SURABAYA, Indonesia, Jan 1 (Reuters) – A break
in bad weather raised hopes on Thursday that divers would be
able to investigate what is believed to be the sunken wreck of
an AirAsia (Kuala Lumpur: 5099.KLnews) jet off Borneo and retrieve the black boxes that
should explain the cause of the crash.

The Airbus A320-200, carrying 162 people, fell from
the sky while trying to climb above stormy weather early on
Sunday, during a flight from the Indonesian city of Surabaya to
Singapore. The pilots did not issue a distress signal.

So far, at least seven bodies have been recovered from
waters near where sonar has detected a large, dark object on the
ocean floor, lying just 30-50 metres (100-165 feet) deep, but
heavy seas have so far prevented divers from investigating it.

“They will try again this morning,” said Siahala Alamsyah, a
naval officer involved in the search. He said that on Wednesday
night, bad weather had prevented a team of 47 Indonesian Navy
divers from even flying out to warships at the crash site.

The plane’s black box flight data and cockpit voice recorder
should help solve the mystery of the crash. Investigators are
working on a theory that it went into aerodynamic stall as the
pilot climbed steeply to avoid a storm.

Bodies recovered from the Java Sea are being taken in
numbered coffins to Surabaya, where relatives of the victims
have gathered, for identification. Authorities have been
collecting DNA from the relatives to help identify the bodies.

Some of the bodies recovered so far have been fully clothed,
including a flight attendant still wearing her AirAsia uniform.
That could indicate the Airbus was intact when it hit the water
and also support the aerodynamic stall theory.

Most of the 162 people on board were Indonesians. No
survivors have been found.

HUNT FOR “BLACK BOX”

Strong wind and waves hampered the search and with
visibility at less than a kilometre (half a mile), the air
operation was called off on Wednesday afternoon.

“The weather today was really challenging in the field, with
waves up to 5 metres high, wind reaching 40 km per hour (and)
heavy rain, especially in the search area,” Fransiskus Bambang
Soelistyo, the head of the search and rescue agency, said.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo said his priority was
retrieving the bodies.

Relatives, many of whom collapsed in grief when they saw the
first grim television pictures confirming their fears on
Tuesday, held prayers at a crisis centre at Surabaya airport.

“UNBELIEVABLY” STEEP CLIMB

The plane was travelling at 32,000 feet (9,753 metres) and
had asked to fly at 38,000 feet to avoid bad weather. When air
traffic controllers granted permission for a rise to 34,000 feet
a few minutes later, they received no response.

A source close to the probe into what happened said radar
data appeared to show that the aircraft made an “unbelievably”
steep climb before it crashed, possibly pushing it beyond the
Airbus A320’s limits.

“So far, the numbers taken by the radar are unbelievably
high. This rate of climb is very high, too high. It appears to
be beyond the performance envelope of the aircraft,” he said.

The source, who declined to be named, added that more
information was needed to come to a firm conclusion.

Online discussion among pilots has centred on unconfirmed
secondary radar data from Malaysia that suggested the aircraft
was climbing at a speed of 353 knots, about 100 knots too slow,
and that it might have stalled.

The Indonesian captain, a former air force fighter pilot,
had 6,100 flying hours under his belt and the plane last
underwent maintenance in mid-November, according to the airline,
which is 49 percent owned by Malaysia-based budget carrier
AirAsia.

Three airline disasters involving Malaysian-affiliated
carriers in less than a year have dented confidence in the
country’s aviation industry and spooked travellers.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went missing in March on a
trip from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew
and has not been found. On July 17, the same airline’s Flight
MH17 was shot down over Ukraine, killing all 298 people on
board.

On board Flight QZ8501 were 155 Indonesians, three South
Koreans, and one person each from Singapore, Malaysia and
Britain. The co-pilot was French.

The AirAsia group, including affiliates in Thailand, the
Philippines and India, had not suffered a crash since its
Malaysian budget operations began in 2002.

(Additional reporting by Gayatri Suroyo, Kanupriya Kapoor,
Michael Taylor and Charlotte Greenfield in JAKARTA/SURABAYA,
Jane Wardell in SYDNEY and Anshuman Daga in SINGAPORE; Editing
by Mark Bendeich)






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[$$] KKR to Earn Big Payout From Alliance Boots Sale

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By

Alliance Boots GmbH completed its two-part sale to Walgreen Co. on Wednesday, putting buyout firm KKR & Co. on track to roughly quadruple the cash it invested in the European pharmacy giant.

All told, the sale to Walgreen has put about £4.7 billion ($7.3 billion) in cash and stock in KKR’s pocket, according to a person familiar with the matter. The private-equity firm invested about £1.2 billion when it and other investors, including Alliance Boots Executive Chairman Stefano Pessina, took the company private in 2007 in the largest-ever European buyout.

A big reason for the huge haul: KKR and its co-investors accepted stock as part of the purchase price when Walgreen agreed to acquire Alliance Boots in 2012 in a two-part transaction. Walgreen shares have more than doubled since the takeover was agreed upon that June, adding more than $10 billion to their return.

Walgreen on Wednesday completed the second phase of the transaction, acquiring the 55% of Alliance Boots that it didn’t buy in 2012. Walgreen, the largest U.S. pharmacy chain by stores, also changed its name to Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc., and its stock symbol to WBA from WAG.

The combination creates a pharmacy empire with more than 12,800 locations in 11 countries and a vast drug distribution business. It becomes the largest purchaser of prescription drugs globally, which should boost its leverage in negotiations with drug suppliers.

Walgreen shares have soared since the deal was struck despite a postannouncement dip and a $1.1 billion financial forecasting error earlier in 2014 that prompted a management shake-up and spooked some investors.

The merger’s completion brings KKR closer to capping one of the megadeals it led during the buyout boom that preceded the financial crisis.

Multibillion-dollar buyouts from those years have produced mixed results for KKR. The firm’s bet on Texas power provider TXU Corp. soured, resulting in a massive bankruptcy filing in April. KKR’s leveraged buyout of retailer Dollar General Corp. resulted in the firm making nearly five times its money.

Alliance Boots, which was acquired with cash and debt totaling about $18.5 billion, sits squarely with KKR’s big winners. Buyout firms aim to double their investors’ money on corporate buyouts; making four times invested cash in such deals is rare.

Terms of Walgreen’s acquisition of Alliance Boots remained constant throughout the 2½ years it took to complete, with the U.S. pharmacy chain paying for its European counterpart with $9.3 billion in cash and 227.7 million shares. Yet the economics of the transaction greatly improved for the sellers over that time as Walgreen shares surged.

KKR was poised to do slightly better than double its money when the deal was struck in 2012 and Walgreen shares traded at $31.96. The stock closed Wednesday at $76.20.

KKR said Wednesday it owns about 4.6% of the combined company’s stock.

In all, the Alliance Boots sellers’ take was worth $27.3 billion as of Wednesday. At the time the two-part deal was announced, Alliance Boots was valued at $16.2 billion.

Mr. Pessina, by eschewing cash and taking his share in stock, could turn out to the deal’s biggest winner. The 73-year-old founded Franco-Italian pharmaceutical wholesaler Alliance Sante SA in 1977 and about three decades later merged his company with British pharmacy operator Boots Group PLC.

One of the richest men in Italy, Mr. Pessina is the combined company’s largest shareholder and will serve as its acting chief executive, replacing Greg Wasson , who had been Walgreen’s CEO since 2009 and is retiring with completion of the merger.

Write to Ryan Dezember at ryan.dezember@wsj.com

 





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Cramer: Buy in increments

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Your first trade for 2015

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Year-To-Date Winners: We Have Found The Market And It's Apple

APPLE – THE BEST OPPORTUNITY EVER?

I SEE APPLE GOING BACK ABOVE $300, SOONER RATHER THAN LATER

The “Fast Money” traders gave their final trades to kick off the new year.

Tim Seymour was a buyer of APC.

Jim Lebenthal was a buyer of IBM.

Brian Kelly was a buyer of VIX calls.

David Seaburg was a buyer of TGT.






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transparent-95031

Amazon continues to launch new e-readers and tablets

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My 2014 Best Performers, Looking Ahead To 2015

Analyzing Amazon’s key strategies to increase its margins (Part 9 of 12)

(Continued from Part 8)

Amazon continues to introduce new e-readers and tablets

In the previous part of this series, we discussed Amazon’s (AMZN) Fire smartphone and why it didn’t succeed. However, the company continues to launch new versions of its e-readers and tablets. During the last quarter, Amazon launched the new Kindle e-reader for $79 with 20% more processing speed and twice the storage of the previous Kindle. The company also launched the Kindle Voyage e-reader, which it claims to be the thinnest and most advanced Kindle ever. Amazon also introduced the Fire HD tablet, which features a quad-core processor and front- and rear-facing cameras.

Amazon’s prospects in the devices market aren’t looking good

Although Amazon has been trying to introduce upgrades to its series of e-readers and tablets, the problem is that overall tablet market growth is declining. According to the latest report from market research firm IDC, and as the chart above shows, the tablet market’s year-over-year growth could slow down from 52.5% in 2013 to 7.2% in 2014, and down to 3.8% by 2018.

The same report also projects that Google’s (GOOG)(GOOGL) Android and Apple (AAPL) iOS will both lose market share, and that Microsoft (MSFT) will gain it. We discussed this in our articles titled  Apple iPad sales could see first year-over-year decline and  Microsoft’s Windows-based tablet should gain market share .

The main point that you should note is that Amazon’s prospects in the devices market aren’t looking good. Its Fire smartphone flopped, while its attempt to grow its e-readers and tablets sales will face obstacles from the overall market’s growth decline.

Continue to Part 10

Browse this series on Market Realist:

  • Handheld & Connected Devices
  • Technology & Electronics
  • Amazon






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2014’s Biggest pops, biggest drops

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Year-To-Date Winners: We Have Found The Market And It's Apple

APPLE – THE BEST OPPORTUNITY EVER?

I SEE APPLE GOING BACK ABOVE $300, SOONER RATHER THAN LATER

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